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FAQ

Why do I lose power?

How can I help?

What should I do if a household member relies on electric equipment for a medical condition?

Why do some people get their power restored faster than others?

My neighbor has power, but I don't. Why?

My electric service is out, but my phone works. Why?

Why don't I see repair crews in my area?

If dry ice is available, how do I use it?


Why do I lose power?

Power outages happen for a number of reasons. Weather, such as wind, heavy snow, and thick ice on trees or tree limbs, can cause trees to contact our wires and cause an outage. Lightning also can strike our equipment or trees near it. In addition to tree contacts, animals occasionally contact parts of our system in a way that causes outages.


How can I help?

When a storm interrupts your power, or causes partial, dim, or flickering lights, you need to let us know. You can notify us via the “Report an Electric Service Problem” link located in the right-hand box of this Web page. Or, you can call 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633).


What should I do if a household member relies on electric equipment for a medical condition?

During power restoration, special attention is paid to restoring facilities such as hospitals and facilities that protect public health. Con Edison also maintains a record of customers who use life-support equipment so that we can contact them in case of an emergency. If you or someone in your household uses such equipment, please let us know by calling 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633). A copy of our life-sustaining equipment survey can be found in our online brochures at Customer Central. The survey contains information about various kinds of medical equipment and how to enroll. Click here. We also recommend that you consider alternative power sources, such as portable generators, to supply electricity to your home in the event of a power outage.


Why do some people get their power restored faster than others?

After a major storm, we tackle outages in order of severity. First, we make every effort to make dangerous areas as safe as possible. We take downed wires out of service. We concentrate on damage assessment through sending out crews to patrol and getting input from civil authorities and our customers.


My neighbor has power, but I don't. Why?

You may be on a different circuit; or, your neighbor may get power from a different direction on the same circuit, bypassing the problem that may still be affecting your service.


My electric service is out, but my phone works. Why?

Phone lines are usually placed lower on utility poles and are protected from damage by higher, stronger electrical lines. Phone lines, which run at very low voltages, can continue to operate even if tree limbs come in contact with them and, in some cases, even when they are lying on the ground.


Why don't I see repair crews in my area?

Immediately after a major storm, we evaluate the damage and address public health and safety situations first. Many of the vehicles we use during storms are clearly marked, but some are not. While you may not see crews or trucks in your area right away, please be assured that we are on the job, assessing and setting priorities for the work we need to do.


If dry ice is available, how do I use it?

  • Keep dry ice wrapped in newspaper, paper bags, or towels for safety and to extend the life of the dry ice.
  • When using dry ice for cooling foods, place the dry ice in the BOTTOM of a cooler, refrigerator, or insulated container.
  • Do not allow foods to have direct contact with the dry ice. Place an insulating material — such as cardboard — between the dry ice and food.
  • Do not put dry ice in your drink.
  • When using dry ice to keep foods frozen, place the dry ice ON TOP of the items you want frozen.
  • A small block of dry ice (5 to 7 pounds) wrapped in an insulating container has an effective cooling time of 18 to 24 hours.

Safe Handling of Dry Ice

  • Dry ice is frozen carbon dioxide — avoid direct contact with the skin.
  • Handle it with care — use gloves, a towel, etc. to insulate your fingers when handling the dry ice.
  • If you must transport dry ice in your car, either open the windows or set the air conditioner to “fresh” outside air rather than “recirculate.” Carbon dioxide build-up can be hazardous in a closed space.
  • Keep children at a safe distance from dry ice at all times!

       
Safe Disposal of Dry Ice

  • Do not dispose of dry ice in a sewer, sink, toilet, garbage disposal, garbage chute, etc.
  • Allow leftover dry ice to evaporate (turn into a gas) in a well-ventilated area where no buildup of carbon dioxide vapor can occur.
  • Keep dry ice away from children and pets.

 

 


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